Prone Band Rotations – Improve Your Posture

Prone Band Rotations – Improve Your Posture

Improve your posture by adding prone resistance band rotations to your back and/or shoulders routine. Although broomstick rotations and standing rotations with a resistance band are very similar and effective, you may find that switching to a prone (face down) position is a great way to take those movements to the next level.

Watch the video (far bottom) for complete instructions.

WHO SHOULD USE THIS EXERCISE?

Everyone that wants to maintain a healthy posture, but most especially those who suffer from kyphosis, scoliosis, narrow shoulders, or an poor posture in general. Upper & lower back pain, shoulder pain, headaches, migraines, knee & hip problems can all be caused by a bad posture.

WHAT MUSCLE ARE WORKED?

  • Rear deltoids
  • Supraspinatus
  • Rhomboids
  • Teres minor
  • Levator Scapulae

 

WHAT ARE THE KEY POINTS?

  • Lie face down
  • Hold the resistance band with a wide grip (outside of shoulder width)
  • Keep the band tight at all times
  • Keep your chest and thighs lifted off of the floor for the entire set
  • Rotate the band over your head until it touches your lower back
  • Return to the starting position and repeat

 

 

Go here for another great exercise for posture!: https://immortal-training.com/prone-butterflies/

Butterfly Hip Thrusters: Glute Activation

Butterfly Hip Thrusters: Glute Activation

WHAT IS GLUTE ACTIVATION?

Glute activation is a process that encourages an exertion of force from the gluteus muscle group that is strong enough to dominate lower body movements as opposed to other muscles, such as the quadriceps, or lower back. If your glutes are firing off properly then you can improve mobility & posture, eliminate migraines, lower & upper back pain, improve eye sight, speed, strength, agility, as well as many other things.

HOW DO I KNOW IF MY GLUTES ARE ACTIVATED?

I recommend taking part in this mobility screening to find out exactly what is going on for sure: https://immortal-training.com

WHO SHOULD USE THIS EXERCISE?

I highly recommend this exercise whether you are male, female, young, or old!

The focus is on gluteus medius, which is responsible for abducting the leg while rotating the femur outwards (i.e. – pulling the leg away from the body). This will help stabilise the hips and knees during big movements such as squats and dead lifts.

One of the main benefits is that the muscles in the hip flexor and adductor areas (in the groin area and inner thighs) will be stretched while the glutes tighten, which will help realign the pelvis into a more ideal position. If bootybuilding is what you are in need of then this move is a necessity!

I have used this exercise on clients for years and, along with a few other movements, have seen it turn flat bums into perky, round ones.

😁

 

Box Squats: How to Advance

Box Squats: How to Advance

The video below explains how to correctly perform and advance the box squat, so that you can eventually squat with perfect form.

WHO SHOULD USE THIS EXERCISE?

Beginners who lack the ideal bio-mechanics for squatting ass-to-the-grass. This could be down to poor glute activation, tight hip flexors, tight hamstrings, bad posture, other issues, or a combination of several factors. To find out more about your overall bio-mechanics you should take part in this mobility test first: https://immortal-training.com/overhead-squat-test/

HOW DO BOX SQUATS WORK?

Box Squats will enable you to slowly increase your squat depth over time without a high risk of injury. The movement can also trick the brain into aligning the pelvis and lumbar into the correct position during your descent. Something about having a target to aim your posterior towards makes this possible. Over time your neurological motor map will change. Thus retraining not only your body, but also your mind, to squat safely and correctly.

HOW TO PERFORM

Main Muscles: Gluteus Maximus, Hamstrings, Quadriceps

Key Points:

  • Keep your chest up, back straight & ass out
  • Hold a stick on the back of your shoulders
  • Stand with feet just outside of shoulder width, toes slightly pointed out
  • Squat down to the box, sit back slightly and drive yourself back up through the heels

 

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